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Cherry Blossom, The Miracle of Spring

Codroipo (Udine). I know it’s absolutely normal, but to my eyes every year it looks like a miracle: when after a long winter (because every winter is long, by definition), trees start their blossoming announcing the nature’s awakening, I’m hypnotised by the beauty of these flowers.

It’s definitely not like the Japanese “sakura” – photographing that event is one of my photographic dreams – but I love it and I’m happy to post this macro photo of a cherry-tree flower here on my blog. And the poplars’ wood behind this “solo” flower, gives a flavour of Italy to the scene…

Happy spring to everybody, from Friuli Venezia Giulia!

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Damien Hirst – Lost Love at Fondazione Prada

Milan (Italy). Yesterday I finally had the opportunity to visit the newly opened Prada Foundation (Fondazione Prada) in Milan – Largo Isarco, 2. The Foundation is hosted in a former industrial site, amazingly redeveloped and reconverted in spaces for exhibitions and cultural activities. It includes also a very trendy bar, designed by the popular movie maker Wes Anderson (author of “The Royal Tenenbaums” and “Grand Budapest Hotel”, just to mention some among his most popular movies).

I promised to myself that I will come to visit the Prada Foundation again soon to take photographs specifically of the buildings, the interior spaces and the architectures (only these things alone are worth a visit). The photo posted here – together with the other two linked at this tag – has been taken inside the “Cisterna” (cistern), a huge building divided in three parts and hosting the temporary exhibition called “Trittico”. Trittico envisages “a dynamic display strategy” and is made by “three carefully selected works from the Collezione Prada, installed at a time and periodically rotating” (from the official website). The name of this installation is Lost Love by Damien Hirst: it’s a cubic submerged gynecologist’s office transformed into an aquarium populated by colored fishes.

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Carrot Cake

Food photography is not an easy assignment. From one side, you must show that the product is “teasing”; from the other one, it must be as much real as possible. Furthermore, there’s the general composition… For this shooting, I agreed with the owner to choose a total white background and a minimal scene, in order to highlight the brown color of this carrot cake together with its ingredients (cinnamon, died fruit and walnuts). I think it is nice!

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Off the Cuff, Palazzo Litta | Fuorisalone @ Milano Design Week 2017

Milan (Italy). Here we are again: one year has passed, and Milan is again the place to be for architects, interior designers, bloggers, design lovers and simple curious – like me. Well, this year I’m a bit beyond the pure curiosity, since I’m completing the renovation of my apartment and I feel myself much more involved than the past year. But this is a personal stuff, and I guess it won’t interest anyone.

The Fuorisalone is the “unplugged” face of the Milan Design Week (the official name is “Salone Internazionale del Mobile”), and it’s a set of events taking places in different parts of Milan, including some prestigious and hidden locations. The list counts almost 1,500 events, scattered all around Milan downtown: Brera, Isola, Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate and Tortona are the most popular and dense of events locations, but more or less every part of the city has something to offer.

Under the tag Fuorisalone 2017 I’m posting my personal way to watch, visit and photograph the many exhibitions, installations, events and any other thing that can be considered as “design”. If you don’t have enough, you can give a look to past editions’ events here (2016) and here (2015).

Palazzo Litta in Corso Magenta is another popular destination of every Fuorisalone. It’s the first place I usually visit, because it’s just behind my office. The building itself is very beautiful, but the most interesting thing to see – in my opinion – is the courtyard installation. This year, visitors are welcomed by a roof canopy composed of 300 pairs of jeans (by Trussardi) connected each other waist-to-waist and cuff-to-cuff to create a very original net.


Milano. Eccoci di nuovo: un anno è passato, e Milano è nuovamente il posto giusto per architetti, disegnatori di interni, blogger, amanti del design e semplici curiosi – come me. A dire il vero, quest’anno sono un po’ oltre la pura curiosità, dal momento che sto terminando la ristrutturazione del mio appartamento e mi sento molto più coinvolto degli anni passati. Ma questa è una facecnda personale, e immagino non interessi a nessuno.

Il Fuorisalone è il lato “non ufficiale” del Salone Internazionale del Mobile, e offre una serie di eventi in diverse parti di Milano, incluse alcuni luoghi prestigiosi o nascosti. La lista conta quasi 1,500 eventi, sparsi in giro per il centro di Milano: Brera, Isola, l’Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate e Tortona sono tra le zone a più famose e con la più alta densità di eventi, ma più o meno ogni parte della città ha qualcosa da offrire.

Sotto al tag Fuorisalone 2017 posto il mio personale sguardo sulle varie mostre, installazioni, eventi e tutto ciò che può essere considerato “design”. Se non ne avete abbastanza, potete anche guardare le foto degli eventi delle passate edizioni qui (2016) e qui (2015).

Palazzo Litta in Corso Magenta è un’altra destinazione molto popolare di ogni Fuorisalone. In genere, questo è il primo posto che visito perchè è proprio dietro il mio ufficio. Il palazzo stesso è molto bello, ma la cosa più interessante da vedere – secondo me – è l’installazione fatta nel cortile. Quest’anno, i visitatori sono accolti da una grande tettoia fatta con 300 paia di jeans (Trussardi) uniti l’uno con l’altro dalla vita e dalla caviglia, creando così una rete molto particolare.

 

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The Chapel of Bones in Evora, Portugal

Evora (Portugal). It’s Halloween, again! Did you notice it? I guess so… In the past weeks the number of photos shared on social networks about Halloween parties and related events have been increasing and increasing. It seems that people are thinking only about this event: there’s a general excitement, and to be honest I do not understand the reason.

Let me speak frankly: I do not like Halloween at all. Perhaps it’s because I’m not American, but for sure I don’t feel it as a traditional recurrence of my calendar. In Italy, in the past years, there has been a growing interest on Halloween, but mainly – I suppose – for consumerist reasons: supermarkets are full of Halloween-related products, candies, sweets, masks and of course the traditional pumpkins (which are much better prepared with a good risotto, than carved and illuminated with candles). For sure, when I was a baby, there wasn’t any Halloween to celebrate with my friends: nobody dressed me to look like a zombie or a skeleton, and I never walked around my neighborhood knocking at every door and asking “trick or treat?” (despite all these things, I had a happy childhood – believe me).

Anyhow: if this is the trend, let’s surf it! At least, my intention is sharing photos from my travels, therefore I decided to wait for Halloween to post this one taken during my recent trip around Portugal (perhaps I’m too commercial, but I try to be fully in line with the contemporary spirit of Halloween). I took this photo when I went to Evora, a lovely and old little city some kilometers south-east of Lisbon. One of the main touristic attractions here, is the “Chapel of Bones” (Capela dos Ossos, in Portuguese), which is connected to the Church of St. Francis. This is a very weird place, a bit shocking at the beginning; but at the end I enjoyed the visit. I didn’t know it, but there are several other “chapel of bones” around the world: one is in Rome, another one is in Milan (San Bernardino Alle Ossa); in all of them, bones are used to decorate walls also with the main scope of transmitting the message of being “transitory” (a sort of “memento mori”). In Evora’s Capela dos Ossos this is confirmed at the entrance, where the motto “We bones that here are, for yours await” welcomes the visitors. I found it pleasantly grim…

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Lace by Giopato & Coombes | Fuorisalone @ Milano Design Week 2017

Milan (Italy). Here we are again: one year has passed, and Milan is again the place to be for architects, interior designers, bloggers, design lovers and simple curious – like me. Well, this year I’m a bit beyond the pure curiosity, since I’m completing the renovation of my apartment and I feel myself much more involved than the past year. But this is a personal stuff, and I guess it won’t interest anyone.

The Fuorisalone is the “unplugged” face of the Milan Design Week (the official name is “Salone Internazionale del Mobile”), and it’s a set of events taking places in different parts of Milan, including some prestigious and hidden locations. The list counts almost 1,500 events, scattered all around Milan downtown: Brera, Isola, Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate and Tortona are the most popular and dense of events locations, but more or less every part of the city has something to offer.

Under the tag Fuorisalone 2017 I’m posting my personal way to watch, visit and photograph the many exhibitions, installations, events and any other thing that can be considered as “design”. If you don’t have enough, you can give a look to past editions’ events here (2016) and here (2015).

The image here above shows Lace by Giopato & Coombes, an interesting chandelier made of glass rings forming a very long and complex structure: when light is not only something “to see”, but also “to be seen”.


Milano. Eccoci di nuovo: un anno è passato, e Milano è nuovamente il posto giusto per architetti, disegnatori di interni, blogger, amanti del design e semplici curiosi – come me. A dire il vero, quest’anno sono un po’ oltre la pura curiosità, dal momento che sto terminando la ristrutturazione del mio appartamento e mi sento molto più coinvolto degli anni passati. Ma questa è una facecnda personale, e immagino non interessi a nessuno.

Il Fuorisalone è il lato “non ufficiale” del Salone Internazionale del Mobile, e offre una serie di eventi in diverse parti di Milano, incluse alcuni luoghi prestigiosi o nascosti. La lista conta quasi 1,500 eventi, sparsi in giro per il centro di Milano: Brera, Isola, l’Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate e Tortona sono tra le zone a più famose e con la più alta densità di eventi, ma più o meno ogni parte della città ha qualcosa da offrire.

Sotto al tag Fuorisalone 2017 posto il mio personale sguardo sulle varie mostre, installazioni, eventi e tutto ciò che può essere considerato “design”. Se non ne avete abbastanza, potete anche guardare le foto degli eventi delle passate edizioni qui (2016) e qui (2015).

La foto qui sopra mostra l’interessante lampadario Lace di Giopato & Coombes realizzato con anelli di vetro a formare una lunga e complessa struttura: quando la luce non è solo un qualcosa “per guardare”, ma anche “per essere guardata”.

 

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Smile, You Are at the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle

Paris (France). This is the third photo, after this one and this one. I’m not sure if there will be another one or two, but – as already said – I find the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris such an incredible source of inspiration! It’s so unique!


Parigi. Questa è la terza foto, dopo questa e questa. Non so se ce ne sarà un’altra o un altro paio, ma – come ho già detto – trovo che il Museo Nazionale di Storia Naturale di Parigi sia un’incredibile fonte di ispirazione! E’ così unico!

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Jorge Mendez Blake – The Castle at the 13th Istanbul Biennial

Istanbul (Turkey). To write this post, I decided to unearth an old photo taken years ago (in 2013) at the 13th Istanbul Biennial – and I did it for two reasons…

The first one, it’s because in these days – after another horrifying terrorist attack, which killed more than 40 people at the Ataturk Airport – I have Istanbul in my heart more than ever. Those who know me (or, at least, those who follow my blog) know how much I love Istanbul, a city where I have lived many years and that completely changed my life (and not only because it was in Istanbul where I discovered my passion for photography, one Sunday afternoon during a walk along the Bosphorus).

The second reason, it’s because I’m more and more convinced that the most efficient (and probably the only) way to fight terrorism, is opening people’s minds to culture; and it’s not a coincidence that one of the activities of terrorist groups is the destruction of cultural heritage (I already wrote some thoughts on it in a post about a night visit at Louvre Museum).

The Jorge Mendez Blake’s work, exhibited at the 13th Istanbul Biennial, was perfectly describing – and it still today describes, without the need of a single word – what I’m trying to explain in this short post. A book, wisely positioned at the base of a wall, shows its destructive force, creating a discontinuity in a tall and solid structure made by little bricks.The metaphor is rather evident: spreading culture will create many of these “discontinuities” and will make walls – built up with terror and hate – collapse.

You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one….

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