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Design Week

Fuorisalone 2016 (Milan Design Week) – 50 Manga Chairs by Oky Sato / Nendo at San Simpliciano

Milan (Italy). In these days, Milan seems “the place to be” – and not only for architecture lovers, trendy designers and unmissable hipsters. For sure, like every year around this period, the city attracts an incredible amount of people coming here to discover the latest tendencies in the sectors of furniture, lighting, decoration and home appliances.

I cannot miss the opportunity of keeping my eye (and my camera) on this interesting world of course, and I like to share what I’m seeing here in my photoblog (isn’t it its purposes?). What’s really impressive, for those people living here all the year, is assisting to a true and deep change in the city’s spirit: let me try to better express myself. Although I consider Milan as probably the most living, enjoyable, innovative and “sparkling” city in Italy (for sure, one of the best life quality), during the so called “design week” the “routine” goes through an authentic transformation, which means pulling out a completely new soul made not only of parties, events, vernissage, opening ceremonies and installations (these things are pretty normal – let me say) but made of a sense of general “discovery”. Yes, during the Fuorisalone’s week, Milan’s people (re)discover their city made of hidden courtyards, beautiful buildings (some of them exceptionally open to public), street decorations and so on. In other words, it looks like a sort of “inspirational wave” floods the city’s districts (not only the fashionable Brera or 5 Vie, but also Lambrate, Tortona etc.) to demonstrate that the urban environment can react to the daily routine, and transform the ordinary into something of extraordinary.

Of course there are critics: why it can’t be all the year? Why the next week – once the design events will be over – Milan will return to hide its beauty? I’m not in a position to answer; but as long as I see that this creative magma is still boiling under the city’s asphalt, the enthusiasm’s eruption of the design week is very, very welcome!

The photograph posted here shows the wonderful exhibition of “50 Manga Chairs” by the Japanese – Canadian designer Oky Sato, included in 2006 (when he was only 29 years old) in “The 100 Most Respected Japanese” ranking prepared by Newsweek magazine, winner of innumerable awards and with a long list of collections exposed at the most prestigious museums all around the world (from the MoMA of New York to the Victoria and Albert Museum of London; from the Centre Pompidou of Paris to the Triennale Design Museum of Milan). I loved the concept of this exhibition, which – by the way – is hosted in what I think is one of the most beautiful and prestigious locations of the entire “Fuorisalone 2016”, the cloister at San Simpliciano church, in the heart of Brera district (and for those visiting it, do not miss a walk in this wonderful and old church).

The exhibition includes 50 chairs, each one based on typical Manga comics’ abstract lines and shapes: the idea is perfectly displayed in a video at the end of the exhibition, and I think visitors should start from it to better understand the concept of Oky Sato’s work. Each chair is made of stainless steel, and all of them have the same basic frame (legs and seatback): what it changes and makes each piece something of unique is the “decoration”, representative of an emulation of the movement – as it is described in a manga comic. If the observer remains concentrated on a single chair per time analyzing its decoration, at the end she will perceive – with the chair itself – the emotion given by the represented movement. The result is a collection of 50 objects conceptually very static (such as chairs can be) but emotionally incredibly dynamic. A great contrast – the one between statics and dynamism – that only a great designer, such as Oky Sato, can represent in this masterful way.

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San Simpliciano, NODUS Breaking Boundaries | Fuorisalone @ Milano Design Week 2017

Milan (Italy). Here we are again: one year has passed, and Milan is again the place to be for architects, interior designers, bloggers, design lovers and simple curious – like me. Well, this year I’m a bit beyond the pure curiosity, since I’m completing the renovation of my apartment and I feel myself much more involved than the past year. But this is a personal stuff, and I guess it won’t interest anyone.

The Fuorisalone is the “unplugged” face of the Milan Design Week (the official name is “Salone Internazionale del Mobile”), and it’s a set of events taking places in different parts of Milan, including some prestigious and hidden locations. The list counts almost 1,500 events, scattered all around Milan downtown: Brera, Isola, Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate and Tortona are the most popular and dense of events locations, but more or less every part of the city has something to offer.

Under the tag Fuorisalone 2017 I’m posting my personal way to watch, visit and photograph the many exhibitions, installations, events and any other thing that can be considered as “design”. If you don’t have enough, you can give a look to past editions’ events here (2016) and here (2015).

The cloister at San Simpliciano church is one of the “Must” of every Fuorisalone: the location itself is fantastic, and the contrast given by the contemporary design of Nodus rugs versus the old traditional cloister’s architecture is perfect. Furthermore, this is a corner of quietness (at least, it was so today) from the mad crowd of Brera Design District, one of the main zone where to find events, expositions and installations.


Milano. Eccoci di nuovo: un anno è passato, e Milano è nuovamente il posto giusto per architetti, disegnatori di interni, blogger, amanti del design e semplici curiosi – come me. A dire il vero, quest’anno sono un po’ oltre la pura curiosità, dal momento che sto terminando la ristrutturazione del mio appartamento e mi sento molto più coinvolto degli anni passati. Ma questa è una facecnda personale, e immagino non interessi a nessuno.

Il Fuorisalone è il lato “non ufficiale” del Salone Internazionale del Mobile, e offre una serie di eventi in diverse parti di Milano, incluse alcuni luoghi prestigiosi o nascosti. La lista conta quasi 1,500 eventi, sparsi in giro per il centro di Milano: Brera, Isola, l’Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate e Tortona sono tra le zone a più famose e con la più alta densità di eventi, ma più o meno ogni parte della città ha qualcosa da offrire.

Sotto al tag Fuorisalone 2017 posto il mio personale sguardo sulle varie mostre, installazioni, eventi e tutto ciò che può essere considerato “design”. Se non ne avete abbastanza, potete anche guardare le foto degli eventi delle passate edizioni qui (2016) e qui (2015).

Il chiostro della chiesa di San Simpliciano è uno dei posti da vedere di ogni Fuorisalone: già il luogo è fantastico, e il contrasto dato dal design contemporaneo dei tappeti Nodus rispetto all’architettura del vecchio chiostro è qualcosa di perfetto. Inoltre, questo è un angolo di tranquillità (almeno, così era oggi) dalla folla impazzita del Brera Design District, una delle zone principali dove trovare eventi, mostre e installazioni.

 

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Fuorisalone 2016 (Milan Design Week) – Baccarat Lumieres Out Of The Box at Brera Distric

Milan (Italy). In these days, Milan seems “the place to be” – and not only for architecture lovers, trendy designers and unmissable hipsters. For sure, like every year around this period, the city attracts an incredible amount of people coming here to discover the latest tendencies in the sectors of furniture, lighting, decoration and home appliances.

I cannot miss the opportunity of keeping my eye (and my camera) on this interesting world of course, and I like to share what I’m seeing here in my photoblog (isn’t it its purposes?). What’s really impressive, for those people living here all the year, is assisting to a true and deep change in the city’s spirit: let me try to better express myself. Although I consider Milan as probably the most living, enjoyable, innovative and “sparkling” city in Italy (for sure, one of the best life quality), during the so called “design week” the “routine” goes through an authentic transformation, which means pulling out a completely new soul made not only of parties, events, vernissage, opening ceremonies and installations (these things are pretty normal – let me say) but made of a sense of general “discovery”. Yes, during the Fuorisalone’s week, Milan’s people (re)discover their city made of hidden courtyards, beautiful buildings (some of them exceptionally open to public), street decorations and so on. In other words, it looks like a sort of “inspirational wave” floods the city’s districts (not only the fashionable Brera or 5 Vie, but also Lambrate, Tortona etc.) to demonstrate that the urban environment can react to the daily routine, and transform the ordinary into something of extraordinary.

Of course there are critics: why it can’t be all the year? Why the next week – once the design events will be over – Milan will return to hide its beauty? I’m not in a position to answer; but as long as I see that this creative magma is still boiling under the city’s asphalt, the enthusiasm’s eruption of the design week is very, very welcome!

The photo posted here has been taken at the Baccarat stand inside the Accademia di Brera Museum: I like shooting this type of subject, it is a nice exercise, given the high contrast between light and darkness… The title of the stand is “Baccarat – Lumières Out of the Box” and these chandeliers – designed by the Dutch designer Marcel Wanders, also known by his iconic Knotted Chair – are the spheric version (therefore very difficult to realise) of the legendary Baccarat model “Zenith”.

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Fuorisalone 2016 (Milan Design Week) – One of the 50 Manga Chairs by Oky Sando at San Simpliciano

Milan (Italy). In these days, Milan seems “the place to be” – and not only for architecture lovers, trendy designers and unmissable hipsters. For sure, like every year around this period, the city attracts an incredible amount of people coming here to discover the latest tendencies in the sectors of furniture, lighting, decoration and home appliances.

I cannot miss the opportunity of keeping my eye (and my camera) on this interesting world of course, and I like to share what I’m seeing here in my photoblog (isn’t it its purposes?). What’s really impressive, for those people living here all the year, is assisting to a true and deep change in the city’s spirit: let me try to better express myself. Although I consider Milan as probably the most living, enjoyable, innovative and “sparkling” city in Italy (for sure, one of the best life quality), during the so called “design week” the “routine” goes through an authentic transformation, which means pulling out a completely new soul made not only of parties, events, vernissage, opening ceremonies and installations (these things are pretty normal – let me say) but made of a sense of general “discovery”. Yes, during the Fuorisalone’s week, Milan’s people (re)discover their city made of hidden courtyards, beautiful buildings (some of them exceptionally open to public), street decorations and so on. In other words, it looks like a sort of “inspirational wave” floods the city’s districts (not only the fashionable Brera or 5 Vie, but also Lambrate, Tortona etc.) to demonstrate that the urban environment can react to the daily routine, and transform the ordinary into something of extraordinary.

Of course there are critics: why it can’t be all the year? Why the next week – once the design events will be over – Milan will return to hide its beauty? I’m not in a position to answer; but as long as I see that this creative magma is still boiling under the city’s asphalt, the enthusiasm’s eruption of the design week is very, very welcome!

The photograph posted here shows the wonderful exhibition of “50 Manga Chairs” by the Japanese – Canadian designer Oky Sato, included in 2006 (when he was only 29 years old) in “The 100 Most Respected Japanese” ranking prepared by Newsweek magazine, winner of innumerable awards and with a long list of collections exposed at the most prestigious museums all around the world (from the MoMA of New York to the Victoria and Albert Museum of London; from the Centre Pompidou of Paris to the Triennale Design Museum of Milan). I loved the concept of this exhibition, which – by the way – is hosted in what I think is one of the most beautiful and prestigious locations of the entire “Fuorisalone 2016”, the cloister at San Simpliciano church, in the heart of Brera district (and for those visiting it, do not miss a walk in this wonderful and old church).

The exhibition includes 50 chairs, each one based on typical Manga comics’ abstract lines and shapes: the idea is perfectly displayed in a video at the end of the exhibition, and I think visitors should start from it to better understand the concept of Oky Sato’s work. Each chair is made of stainless steel, and all of them have the same basic frame (legs and seatback): what it changes and makes each piece something of unique is the “decoration”, representative of an emulation of the movement – as it is described in a manga comic. If the observer remains concentrated on a single chair per time analyzing its decoration, at the end she will perceive – with the chair itself – the emotion given by the represented movement. The result is a collection of 50 objects conceptually very static (such as chairs can be) but emotionally incredibly dynamic. A great contrast – the one between statics and dynamism – that only a great designer, such as Oky Sato, can represent in this masterful way.

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How to Reuse an Old Book | Fuorisalone @ Milano Design Week 2017

Milan (Italy). Here we are again: one year has passed, and Milan is again the place to be for architects, interior designers, bloggers, design lovers and simple curious – like me. Well, this year I’m a bit beyond the pure curiosity, since I’m completing the renovation of my apartment and I feel myself much more involved than the past year. But this is a personal stuff, and I guess it won’t interest anyone.

The Fuorisalone is the “unplugged” face of the Milan Design Week (the official name is “Salone Internazionale del Mobile”), and it’s a set of events taking places in different parts of Milan, including some prestigious and hidden locations. The list counts almost 1,500 events, scattered all around Milan downtown: Brera, Isola, Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate and Tortona are the most popular and dense of events locations, but more or less every part of the city has something to offer.

Under the tag Fuorisalone 2017 I’m posting my personal way to watch, visit and photograph the many exhibitions, installations, events and any other thing that can be considered as “design”. If you don’t have enough, you can give a look to past editions’ events here (2016) and here (2015).

Last night I had a short walk around the “5vie” district, and I visited a studio where some books were exposed. Well, they were not properly “traditional books”, but mostly handcrafted sculptures made by books and manuals. A nice idea to reuse an old book and to save it from the perpetual shelf destiny.


Milano. Eccoci di nuovo: un anno è passato, e Milano è nuovamente il posto giusto per architetti, disegnatori di interni, blogger, amanti del design e semplici curiosi – come me. A dire il vero, quest’anno sono un po’ oltre la pura curiosità, dal momento che sto terminando la ristrutturazione del mio appartamento e mi sento molto più coinvolto degli anni passati. Ma questa è una faccenda personale, e immagino non interessi a nessuno.

Il Fuorisalone è il lato “non ufficiale” del Salone Internazionale del Mobile, e offre una serie di eventi in diverse parti di Milano, incluse alcuni luoghi prestigiosi o nascosti. La lista conta quasi 1,500 eventi, sparsi in giro per il centro di Milano: Brera, Isola, l’Università Statale, 5 Vie, Lambrate e Tortona sono tra le zone a più famose e con la più alta densità di eventi, ma più o meno ogni parte della città ha qualcosa da offrire.

Sotto al tag Fuorisalone 2017 posto il mio personale sguardo sulle varie mostre, installazioni, eventi e tutto ciò che può essere considerato “design”. Se non ne avete abbastanza, potete anche guardare le foto degli eventi delle passate edizioni qui (2016) e qui (2015).

La scorsa notte ho fatto una passeggiata in zona “5vie”, e ho visitato uno studio dove c’erano esposti alcuni libri. A dire il vero, non erano propriamente libri in senso tradizionale, ma piuttosto sculture fatte a mano da libri e codici. Una bella idea per riutilizzare vecchi libri e per salvarli dal destino dello scaffale perenne.

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