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Fondazione Prada

Tom Friedman – Untitled at Fondazione Prada

Milan (Italy). Yesterday I finally had the opportunity to visit the newly opened Prada Foundation (Fondazione Prada) in Milan – Largo Isarco, 2. The Foundation is hosted in a former industrial site, amazingly redeveloped and reconverted in spaces for exhibitions and cultural activities. It includes also a very trendy bar, designed by the popular movie maker Wes Anderson (author of “The Royal Tenenbaums” and “Grand Budapest Hotel”, just to mention some among his most popular movies).

I promised to myself that I will come to visit the Prada Foundation again soon to take photographs specifically of the buildings, the interior spaces and the architectures (only these things alone are worth a visit). The photo posted here – together with the other two linked at this tag – has been taken inside the “Cisterna” (cistern), a huge building divided in three parts and hosting the temporary exhibition called “Trittico”. Trittico envisages “a dynamic display strategy” and is made by “three carefully selected works from the Collezione Prada, installed at a time and periodically rotating” (from the official website). The name of this installation is Untitled by Tom Friedman: a scattered motion of plastic pictograms.

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Damien Hirst – Lost Love at Fondazione Prada

Milan (Italy). Yesterday I finally had the opportunity to visit the newly opened Prada Foundation (Fondazione Prada) in Milan – Largo Isarco, 2. The Foundation is hosted in a former industrial site, amazingly redeveloped and reconverted in spaces for exhibitions and cultural activities. It includes also a very trendy bar, designed by the popular movie maker Wes Anderson (author of “The Royal Tenenbaums” and “Grand Budapest Hotel”, just to mention some among his most popular movies).

I promised to myself that I will come to visit the Prada Foundation again soon to take photographs specifically of the buildings, the interior spaces and the architectures (only these things alone are worth a visit). The photo posted here – together with the other two linked at this tag – has been taken inside the “Cisterna” (cistern), a huge building divided in three parts and hosting the temporary exhibition called “Trittico”. Trittico envisages “a dynamic display strategy” and is made by “three carefully selected works from the Collezione Prada, installed at a time and periodically rotating” (from the official website). The name of this installation is Lost Love by Damien Hirst: it’s a cubic submerged gynecologist’s office transformed into an aquarium populated by colored fishes.

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Pino Pascali – Pinne di Pescecane at Fondazione Prada

Milan (Italy). Yesterday I finally had the opportunity to visit the newly opened Prada Foundation (Fondazione Prada) in Milan – Largo Isarco, 2. The Foundation is hosted in a former industrial site, amazingly redeveloped and reconverted in spaces for exhibitions and cultural activities. It includes also a very trendy bar, designed by the popular movie maker Wes Anderson (author of “The Royal Tenenbaums” and “Grand Budapest Hotel”, just to mention some among his most popular movies).

I promised to myself that I will come to visit the Prada Foundation again soon to take photographs specifically of the buildings, the interior spaces and the architectures (only these things alone are worth a visit). The photo posted here – together with the other two linked at this tag – has been taken inside the “Cisterna” (cistern), a huge building divided in three parts and hosting the temporary exhibition called “Trittico”. Trittico envisages “a dynamic display strategy” and is made by “three carefully selected works from the Collezione Prada, installed at a time and periodically rotating” (from the official website). The name of this installation is Pinne di Pescecane (Shark Fins) by Pino Pascali: five shark fins made of painted canvas on wood. A pillar of his “finte sculture” (fake sculpture), where the term “fake” invites a more nuanced reading, with the animal shape intended always as part of a concealed whole which is left to imagine.

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Bar Luce by Wes Anderson (Fondazione Prada)

Milan (Italy). The Bar Luce is a cool place, for many reasons. First, because its designer is a certain Wes Anderson, one of my favorite movie directors (he’s the author of unforgettable movies such as “The Royal Tenenbaums”, “Fantastic Mr. Fox”, “Moonrise Kingdom” and “The Gran Budapest Hotel”). Second, because this place is inside the Prada Foundation, today one of the most interesting place for contemporary art in Milan.Third, because thanks to its interior design, its floor and to elements such as two old pinball machines and a jukebox, walking into the Bar Luce seems like going back to 1960s.

I recommend coming here early in the morning (they serve brioches coming from the Pasticceria Marchesi, the same one located in Corso Magenta and Galleria Vittorio Emanuele), better avoiding weekends. If you are allergic to hipsters, new normal and radical chic, get ready.

However I repeat, the Bar Luce inside the Fondazione Prada is a cool place…


Milano. Il Bar Luce è un posto figo, per diversi motivi. Per prima cosa, perchè il suo progettista è un certo Wes Anderson, uno dei miei registi preferiti (sono suoi film memorabili come “I Tenenbaum”, “Fantastic Mr. Fox”, “Moonrise Kingdom” e “Gran Budapest Hotel”). Secondo, perchè la location è all’interno della Fondazione Prada, uno degli spazi contemporanei più belli a Milano oggi. Terzo, perchè grazie agli arredi, ai pavimenti e ad accessori come due vecchi flipper e un juke-box, entrando al Bar Luce sembra di andare indietro nel tempo agli anni ’60.

Consiglio di andarci la mattina presto (le brioches vengono dalla Pasticceria Marchesi, la stessa di Corso Magenta e della Galleria Vittorio Emanuele) meglio ancora evitando il fine settimana. Se siete allergici a hipster, new normal e radical chic di vario genere, è bene che vi prepariate.

Comunque ripeto, il Bar Luce dentro la Fondazione Prada è un posto figo…

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The Haunted House at Fondazione Prada in Milan

Milan (Italy). Time ago I visited the Fondazione Prada (Prada Foundation): I wrote some posts about very interesting exhibitions hosted at that time (Thomas Demand, Tom Friedman, Pino Pascali and Damien Hirst), but I didn’t say too much about what is probably the most capturing aspect of this place: the architecture of its spaces.

So, I decided to expand the tag “Fondazione Prada” with some photos focused exclusively on the architectures – with the intention of going there again and taking some more shots.

The Fondazione Prada is a very interesting example of conversion and reutilization of a former and abandoned industrial space into something of completely different. The architects of OMA Studio leaded by the Dutch starchitect Rem Koolhaas worked to keep the original structure – possibly adapting the existing spaces to the needs of a museum – but still giving the feeling to visitors of being in a place totally new, as if it had been built from scratch.

While I was walking around pavilions and photographing around me (this sentence sounds familiar) I was noticing that the majority of structures was not totally new, therefore I still could imagine the site “as it was” in the past, functioning for its original scope (a distillery). But at the same time, some elements – such as for example the “Haunted House” – were bringing me to another dimension, both temporal (for the modernity of their design) and architectural (for the striking contrast of colors and materials). The result, for me, was a sort of “temporal confusion”, something of very intriguing, and that made me conclude that a visit to the Fondazione Prada is absolutely recommended.

Some more photos will follow. Here I used the Nikon Df (the only reflex I still have, and I love it!) mounted with a wide angle Zeiss Distagon ZF.2 18 mm lens.

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Inside but Outside (Galleria Vittorio Emanuele from the Osservatorio, Fondazione Prada)

Milan (Italy). For those who can’t recognize it, this is the dome of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan (the one that for Christmas is decorated with blue lights). But instead of the typical capture from the ground (taken by me too) this time it has been photographed from outside, more precisely from the Osservatorio, Fondazione Prada’s new exhibition space located in Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan and dedicated to photography and visual languages.

To be honest, the exhibition I attended at the end of January didn’t drive me crazy. Except for some authors, I found the photographs exhibited here a bit too much “cutting edge”, but it could be my limit. However, the location is really amazing, even suggestive, thanks to the fact it offers an alternative – opposite – view to the one people are used to see.

And at the end of the visit, it’s a good idea having a break at the Caffè Marchesi to enjoy a cup of coffee and to re-familiarize with the typical view of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II.


Milano. Per quelli che non la riconoscono, questa è la cupola della Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II (quella che a Natale diventa tutta blu, per intendersi). Invece della solita ripresa dal basso (che peraltro ho fatto anche io) questa volta l’ho fotografata dall’esterno, più precisamente da Osservatorio, il nuovo spazio espositivo della Fondazione Prada in Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II a Milano dedicato alla fotografia e ai linguaggi visivi.

La mostra che ho visitato a fine gennaio non mi ha fatto impazzire, devo dirlo. A parte alcuni autori, ho trovato le fotografie esposte un po’ troppo “all’avanguardia”, ma ammetto potrebbe essere un mio limite. In ogni caso, la location è veramente bella, direi quasi suggestiva, proprio grazie al fatto che offre uno sguardo alternativo – opposto – a quello solito a cui siamo abituati.

E a fine visita, vale la pena fermarsi al Caffè Marchesi per una tazza di caffè e per “riambientarsi” alla tipica vista degli spazi della Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II.

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Thomas Demand – Grotto Process at Fondazione Prada

Milan (Italy). Yesterday I finally had the opportunity to visit the newly opened Prada Foundation (Fondazione Prada) in Milan – Largo Isarco, 2. The Foundation is hosted in a former industrial site, amazingly redeveloped and reconverted in spaces for exhibitions and cultural activities. It includes also a very trendy bar, designed by the popular movie maker Wes Anderson (author of “The Royal Tenenbaums” and “Grand Budapest Hotel”, just to mention some among his most popular movies).

I promised to myself that I will come to visit the Prada Foundation again soon to take photographs specifically of the buildings, the interior spaces and the architectures (only these things alone are worth a visit). The photo posted here represents the Grotto Process (Processo Grottesco): in order to realize the photographic work “Grotto”, Thomas Demand studied and reproduced a 3D model of a grotto using many layers of cardboard, which “simulate” the geologic stratification, including stalactites and stalagmites (in the lower left corner of the image, the stratification of cardboard layers is pretty evident). The final photo (displayed at the entrance of the room) demonstrates how something perceived as real, at the end is unreal and artificially reproduced.

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