Tag:

Fountain

The Fountain at the Baku Museum Center

Baku (Azerbaijan). When I enjoy some street photography and I try to capture images of people doing something interesting around me, I also like to imagine what they could think in that exact moment. And the same happens when I watch the shooted photos, as well as when I spend some time (not too much to be honest) in editing them.

Here I was walking around Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan. It was a warm late afternoon and a lot of people were around walking along the nice corniche on the Caspian Sea. In front of a beautiful neoclassical building, there was an imponent and elegant fountain, and a young child was standing in front of it, almost hypnotized by the water flowing high in the sky.

I staid some seconds behind him, as said imagining what he was possibly thinking – or even dreaming, let me say. Everyone knows how much children can fly with their imagination, seeing what adults cannot see anymore… At the same time I captured this image, and the child’s silhouette helped me to give the idea of how big and imponent was the fountain.

It was a nice moment and today it’s still a sweet memory of few days spent in Baku for some meetings. And I’m happy to share it here on my blog with my followers.

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Please, Do Not Pee In The Fountain

Milan (Italy). It’s very hot here in Milan in these days: the temperature is easily rising above 35 degrees Celsius (almost 100° Fahrenheit!) and walking around the city is tough.

For this reason, fountains are very appreciated by people: it’s common to see tourists (and not only) trying to find a bit of refrigeration putting their feet into the fresh water.

However, I was very disappointed when I saw this person peeing in the fountain of Piazza Castello! 🙂

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Frank Gehry for the Louis Vuitton Foundation

Paris (France). The futuristic building, which hosts the Louis Vuitton Foundation (or “Fondation Louis Vuitton” in French) is one of those places where you can spend an entire day, walking up and down the stairs as well as exploring its halls, without getting bored. Furthermore, if you like architecture photography, you will enjoy the challenge of shooting a place characterized by “irregular” shapes, and which seems a ship with sails swollen by the wind. I found photographing this place, designed by the “starchitect” Frank Gehry, at the same time tough and exciting, a truly demanding experience; and I could not enjoy it more!

The photo here is just one of the many I captured during my visit: the light was creating some difficulties and I decided to include in the composition the interesting fountain outside the building. What is difficult to give is the real dimension of the entire structure: it’s really big, but I hardly could find a place to shoot it in its entire development. More photos will follow with the next posts (I will create the tag “Louis Vuitton Foundation”); for the moment, I recommend this place if you are planning a trip to Paris. It’s not the “typical” Parisian location (probably for this reason I liked it even more) although at the time I visited it, there was an amazing exhibition of paintings (Munch, Matisse, Picasso, Brancusi, Mondrian, Malevich just to mention some).

Another plus: the Louis Vuitton Foundation is in the middle of the Jardin d’Acclimatation, a very beautiful garden, very silent and far from the crowd.

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Curiosity

Milan (Italy). I captured this photograph today during my lunch break. I found the curiosity of this group of children for the fountain of Piazza Castello, something of very poetic. That’s it.


Milano. Scattata oggi in pausa pranzo: ho trovato la curiosità di questo gruppo di bambini per la fontana di Piazza Castello molto poetica. Fine.

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The Largest Free Pool in Paris

Paris (France). Here is how Parisians – and of course tourists – fight the heat wave striking Europe in these days of July 2015: transforming the big fountain at the Jardins Du Trocadero into the largest public (and free) pool in town. For sure, given its position and the view of the Tour Eiffel, this “pool” can be considered as probably one of the most exclusive in the world!

I have my personal concerns about the general hygienic conditions, but it seems that people are not particularly worried.

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Afterwork at the Esplanade de la Defense n.3

Paris (France). I frequently spend my after-work time walking around La Défense, a place where I come frequently (even now I’m on a flight from Milan to Paris); and that I have been photographing for years (most of my photos at La Defense are posted under this tag expressly created). Every time I wonder the same questions about this place. Do I like it? Honestly, I don’t know. How it could be living here? I can hardly answer this question too, and I admit I find myself watching residents trying to understand how is the quality of their lives. But the question in absolute terms most difficult to answer is always the same: how will be this place in – I don’t know, let’s say – ten years?

Yet, I must admit that in terms of photography, La Defense is still one of the most interesting places to explore in Paris; its architectures and its urban development are worth being analysed with attention, especially because they reveal a sort of historical stratification. Since the end of the ’50s, with the construction of the CNIT (Centre des nouvelles industries et technologies) building, through the ’70s and the ’80s with buildings such as the Tour Areva and the Tour Total, until beginning of 2000 with the erection of more futuristic skyscrapers like the Tour EDF, La Defense has become the largest business park in Europe.

Very personally, the feeling I have when I walk along its extended “Esplanade”, between the Grand Arche and the fountain close to Neully-sur-Seine, is the one of a place that has begun a slow but relentless and conscious decadence (even if embellished by marvelous early fall sunsets), and that for some aspects is even proud of it, according to the most typical Parisian style. The economic crisis, which has not spared France, the competition with other “banlieues”, which are trying to attract similar developments, and the transportation network, which has already reached its maximum capacity and therefore can’t increase the number of commuters transported daily, are posing serious obstacles to the growth of this area and probably it couldn’t be different.

If it’s true that knowing the past is necessary to understand the future, I think that the future of La Defense is written into its glorious (albeit unique) past, in its having been a symbol for the 20th century’s city planners, but also a place that has lost its leadership in favor of new different models. But It is still a place that is worth being visited and photographed, possibly posing some questions: and if someone has the answer(s) to mine, I’d be glad to know it.


Parigi. La Defense è una zona di Parigi che frequento molto per lavoro (anche adesso sono su un volo da Milano a Parigi) e dove mi capita spesso di camminare: nel tempo ho scattato diverse fotografie, che pubblico qui nel blog con un tag appositamente creato, e ogni volta mi interrogo su come sia questo posto. Mi piace? Non lo so. Come potrebbe essere vivere qui? Anche questa sinceramente è una domanda a cui rispondo a fatica, tanto che – lo ammetto – mi ritrovo a guardare con curiosità i residenti, cercando di capire la qualità della loro vita. Ma la domanda in assoluto più difficile è sempre la stessa: come sarà questo posto tra – non so, diciamo – dieci anni?

Eppure, devo ammettere che dal punto di vista fotografico rimane uno dei posti più interessanti di Parigi da esplorare; le sue architetture e il suo sviluppo urbanistico meritano di essere osservate con attenzione, soprattutto perché rivelano una sorta di “stratificazione” storica. Tra la fine degli anni ’50, con la costruzione dell’edificio CNIT (Centre des nouvelles industries et technologies), attraverso gli anni ’70 e ’80 con edifici come la Torre Areva e la Torre Total, fino a inizio 2000 con la realizzazione di grattacieli più avveniristici (tra cui la Torre EDF), La Defense ha visto uno sviluppo che l’ha portata a essere il più grande centro direzionale d’Europa.

Molto personalmente, la sensazione che si ha camminando dopo una giornata di lavoro lungo la sua enorme “Esplanade”, dal Grand Arche alla fontana in prossimità di Neully-sur-Seine, è quella di un posto che ha iniziato una lenta ma inesorabile e consapevole decadenza (magari abbellita dai meravigliosi tramonti di inizio autunno), e che per certi aspetti riesce ad andare fiero di questa cosa, nel più classico stile parigino. La crisi economica che ha colpito anche la Francia, la competizione di altre zone della banlieue che cercano di attirare analoghi sviluppi urbanistici e la saturazione dei mezzi di trasporto che difficilmente potrebbero portare nuovi afflussi di persone, stanno creando dei seri ostacoli alla crescita di questa area, e probabilmente non potrebbe essere diversamente.

Se è vero che per capire il futuro bisogna conoscere il passato, penso che il futuro di questo posto sia scritto nella sua storia gloriosa ma irripetibile, nel suo essere stato un luogo simbolo per l’urbanistica del ventesimo secolo ma che oggi ha perso la sua leadership a favore di altri modelli. Ma che rimane un posto da vedere, da fotografare, e sul quale porsi certe domande: e se qualcuno – alle mie – può darmi una risposta, sarei ben lieto di saperlo.

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Afterwork at the Esplanade de la Defense n.2

Paris (France). I frequently spend my after-work time walking around La Défense, a place where I come frequently (even now I’m on a flight from Milan to Paris); and that I have been photographing for years (most of my photos at La Defense are posted under this tag expressly created). Every time I wonder the same questions about this place. Do I like it? Honestly, I don’t know. How it could be living here? I can hardly answer this question too, and I admit I find myself watching residents trying to understand how is the quality of their lives. But the question in absolute terms most difficult to answer is always the same: how will be this place in – I don’t know, let’s say – ten years?

Yet, I must admit that in terms of photography, La Defense is still one of the most interesting places to explore in Paris; its architectures and its urban development are worth being analysed with attention, especially because they reveal a sort of historical stratification. Since the end of the ’50s, with the construction of the CNIT (Centre des nouvelles industries et technologies) building, through the ’70s and the ’80s with buildings such as the Tour Areva and the Tour Total, until beginning of 2000 with the erection of more futuristic skyscrapers like the Tour EDF, La Defense has become the largest business park in Europe.

Very personally, the feeling I have when I walk along its extended “Esplanade”, between the Grand Arche and the fountain close to Neully-sur-Seine, is the one of a place that has begun a slow but relentless and conscious decadence (even if embellished by marvelous early fall sunsets), and that for some aspects is even proud of it, according to the most typical Parisian style. The economic crisis, which has not spared France, the competition with other “banlieues”, which are trying to attract similar developments, and the transportation network, which has already reached its maximum capacity and therefore can’t increase the number of commuters transported daily, are posing serious obstacles to the growth of this area and probably it couldn’t be different.

If it’s true that knowing the past is necessary to understand the future, I think that the future of La Defense is written into its glorious (albeit unique) past, in its having been a symbol for the 20th century’s city planners, but also a place that has lost its leadership in favor of new different models. But It is still a place that is worth being visited and photographed, possibly posing some questions: and if someone has the answer(s) to mine, I’d be glad to know it.


Parigi. La Defense è una zona di Parigi che frequento molto per lavoro (anche adesso sono su un volo da Milano a Parigi) e dove mi capita spesso di camminare: nel tempo ho scattato diverse fotografie, che pubblico qui nel blog con un tag appositamente creato, e ogni volta mi interrogo su come sia questo posto. Mi piace? Non lo so. Come potrebbe essere vivere qui? Anche questa sinceramente è una domanda a cui rispondo a fatica, tanto che – lo ammetto – mi ritrovo a guardare con curiosità i residenti, cercando di capire la qualità della loro vita. Ma la domanda in assoluto più difficile è sempre la stessa: come sarà questo posto tra – non so, diciamo – dieci anni?

Eppure, devo ammettere che dal punto di vista fotografico rimane uno dei posti più interessanti di Parigi da esplorare; le sue architetture e il suo sviluppo urbanistico meritano di essere osservate con attenzione, soprattutto perché rivelano una sorta di “stratificazione” storica. Tra la fine degli anni ’50, con la costruzione dell’edificio CNIT (Centre des nouvelles industries et technologies), attraverso gli anni ’70 e ’80 con edifici come la Torre Areva e la Torre Total, fino a inizio 2000 con la realizzazione di grattacieli più avveniristici (tra cui la Torre EDF), La Defense ha visto uno sviluppo che l’ha portata a essere il più grande centro direzionale d’Europa.

Molto personalmente, la sensazione che si ha camminando dopo una giornata di lavoro lungo la sua enorme “Esplanade”, dal Grand Arche alla fontana in prossimità di Neully-sur-Seine, è quella di un posto che ha iniziato una lenta ma inesorabile e consapevole decadenza (magari abbellita dai meravigliosi tramonti di inizio autunno), e che per certi aspetti riesce ad andare fiero di questa cosa, nel più classico stile parigino. La crisi economica che ha colpito anche la Francia, la competizione di altre zone della banlieue che cercano di attirare analoghi sviluppi urbanistici e la saturazione dei mezzi di trasporto che difficilmente potrebbero portare nuovi afflussi di persone, stanno creando dei seri ostacoli alla crescita di questa area, e probabilmente non potrebbe essere diversamente.

Se è vero che per capire il futuro bisogna conoscere il passato, penso che il futuro di questo posto sia scritto nella sua storia gloriosa ma irripetibile, nel suo essere stato un luogo simbolo per l’urbanistica del ventesimo secolo ma che oggi ha perso la sua leadership a favore di altri modelli. Ma che rimane un posto da vedere, da fotografare, e sul quale porsi certe domande: e se qualcuno – alle mie – può darmi una risposta, sarei ben lieto di saperlo.

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La Vedovella del Castello Sforzesco, Milano

Milan (Italy). One – and probably the first – upside of having a photoblog in English, is that my posts are more or less accessible to everyone from different parts of the world. The problem comes when I have to translate something of “very local”, such as the word “Vedovella”…

Vedovella is the endearment of “vedova” (the English word “widow“) and here in Milan the term “vedovella” is used for the numerous fountains positioned all around the city (it seems there are some 500 fountains in Milan, as confirmed by this interactive map on line). The name “vedovella” is given by the fact that these fountains “cry” for the whole day, 24/7, exactly as a widow does (or is supposed to do). Another name used for these fountains is a more exotic “Drago Verde” (green dragon) for the shape of the faucet and the color of the body. However, I prefer the name “vedovella”, it’s much more romantic and poetic…

One of the things I love to do during my lunch break is walking around my office photographing all the interesting things around me (here’s the name and the philosophy of my photoblog). It’s a good excuse to move my legs, to oxygen my brain and to stimulate my curiosity – even for things that I have seen thousands of times – moving my concentration to something different than business. It’s not easy returning to work after this sort of evasion, but at least I enjoyed my lunch break much more than if I stayed at my desk working (as I’m going to do right now…)

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Nightlife At Piazza Gae Aulenti in Milan

Milan (Italy). I love my Ricoh GR! The purpose of this blog is not reviewing (and promoting) cameras, lenses or other photographic equipments: if you have been following me for time, you probably noticed that there are no advertisements or links to sellers here. However, I must say that the Ricoh GR camera is a great tool if you want to have fun walking around (I mean, without the specific intent of taking your camera bag and walking around for photographing something). Just bring it with you – as a phone, it perfectly fits in your pockets – and I’m sure that each time you will find at least a good reason to use it. Someone says that a camera-phone is more than enough, but I totally disagree: for me there’s no better than ta Ricoh GR.

Ok, back to this post: last Sunday I was walking around Milan, just to breathe some fresh air at the end of a very hot and humid day. I headed to Piazza Gae Aulenti, a modern and interesting area in town recently re-designed and hosting intriguing architectures. There’s a “futuristic” fountain, with coloured water jets surrounding the “Solar Tree”, a lamp designed by Ross Lovegrove for Artemide. I thought that a long-exposure photograph was a nice way to represent the atmosphere there, with people looking in a certain sense like ghosts, as if the hotness was making them “evaporating”. This is the final result: not my best photograph – I know this – but for sure something that a camera-phone will never let me shoot (and – most important – something I liked to do).

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National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York

New York (USA). I visited the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in 2012. It ‘a place that should be visited in absolute silence, not only in respect to the many people that have lost their lives here, but also meditating on how that day changed the world. Today, on the 15th anniversary of that tragic September 11, I decided to prepare and post an old photo taken during this visit. While developing it, many things experienced during this visit came to my mind: the engraved names of dead people, the flowers left by their family, the incredible number of people – of all races and religions – walking silently around the huge fountains built in correspondence of the Twin Towers. It was my way to commemorate that tragic unforgettable day.


New York. Ho visitato il National September 11 Memorial and Museum nel 2012. E’ un posto che va visitato in assoluto silenzio, non solo in rispetto alle tante persone che qui hanno perso la loro vita, ma anche in meditazione su come quel giorno ha cambiato il mondo. Oggi, nel 15esimo anniversario di quel tragico 11 Settembre, ho deciso di riprendere una foto scattata durante tale visita. Mentre la preparavo per postarla qui sul blog, mi sono tornate in mente tante cose vissute durante quella visita: dai nomi incisi delle persone morte, ai fiori lasciati dai loro familiari, alla incredibile quantità di persone – di ogni razza e religione – che camminavano silenziosamente intorno alle enormi fontane costruite in corrispondenza delle Torri Gemelle. E’ stato un modo – per me – di commemorare quella tragica indimenticabile giornata.

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