Tag:

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Glimpse of Trieste

Trieste (Italy). When you say “Canal Grande”, people normally think about the Venetian one (which, by the way, I photographed not too long time ago). But there’s another Canal Grande, the one photographed here, which offers one of the nicest glimpse of Trieste. I like this city, thanks to its position – close to the Austrian and the Slovenian borders – and to its long history, it is able to transmit the feeling of a multicultural, multi-religion and mitteleuropean city. Just to mention an example: during the beginning of the XX century, Trieste was counting a large number of religions, as well as many different languages spoken in its elegant streets.

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Climbing Up to the Castle (Salita al Castello di Udine)

Udine (Italy). Giovanni Boccaccio mentions Udine and the Friuli region in the 10th Day’s “Fifth Novel” of his most famous masterpiece Decameron written in 1350.

“In Friuli, a country, though cold, glad with goodly mountains and store of rivers and clear springs, is a city called Udine…”

The feelings I have when I walk around Udine are those of a very pleasant city with high life quality, characterized by a typical medieval urban tissue perfectly integrated with stylish shops, cozy cafes and beautiful bookstores.

I love so much visiting Udine and photographing its glimpses. This one in the image is the colonnade along the steep way to the Castle, captured some days ago at sunset.


Udine. Giovanni Boccaccio menziona Udine e il Friuli nella “Novella Quinta” della decima giornata del suo celebre Decameron, scritto intorno al 1350:

“In Frioli, paese, quantunque freddo, lieto di belle montagne, di più fiumi e di chiare fontane, è una terra chiamata Udine…”

Le sensazioni che si hanno passeggiando per Udine sono quelle di una cittadina assai piacevole con una alta qualità della vita, caratterizzata da un’impronta urbanistica tipicamente medievale che si concilia perfettamente con negozi eleganti, caffè ospitali e belle librerie.

Mi piace molto visitare Udine e fotografarne alcuni suoi scorci. Questo nella foto è il colonnato che accompagna la ripida salita al Castello, in uno scatto fatto giorni fa al tramonto.

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The Wooden Chapel of Madonna della Pescheria of Portogruaro

Portogruaro (Italy). It’s the end of the year, and it’s therefore time for greetings… Some days ago I went to Portogruaro to meet some friends, and I brought my Leica Q camera, just in case… Portogruaro is a very nice old town located in the north-eastern part of Italy, across the border between Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia regions, not too far from Venice. It was quite cold and very, very foggy. And of course, I could not resist the temptation of shooting some night photos around (although my hands were freezing)…

To do this, I chose one of the most characteristic observatory points of this lovely town: it’s a chapel made of wood and dedicated to the “Madonna della Pescheria” (roughly translatable into something more or less like “Holy Virgin Mary of the Fish Market”, but I admit it’s a bit funny). Here, the Lemene river moves the wheel of two old watermills, before heading to the Lagoon of Caorle where it meets the Adriatic Sea. The Chapel dates back to 1627 (as reported in a note on the chapel’s door) and every year there’s a traditional celebration around it, with people coming along the river with their boats, bringing gifts to the Holy Virgin Mary.

I love these hidden corners of Italy: they are able to surprise me every time. As I always say, Italy is like a precious necklace, where main cities (such as Florence, Venice or Rome) are the biggest diamonds, but small towns – like, for example, Portogruaro – are small shining gems and therefore are not less important than the more popular destinations…

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This Lady Did Not Like Me (Taking Her Photo at f/1.7)

Udine (Italy). I like this kind of situation, and for this reason, I do love my 28 mm summilux, which gives me the freedom of photographing around me (these last three words sound familiar) without caring too much about what people could think.

This is the story behind this photo: everything happened some days ago, when I was having a walk around Udine. It was already dark when I stopped in Piazza San Giacomo – it’s such a lovely place, one of the most popular destinations in town, with very nice cafes and crowded with people that choose this square to meet their friends and chat. The street surrounding the square is all covered with small stones – as many other streets in the old part of Udine – and I liked the effect they can make if I take a photo few centimeters from the ground, focusing half meter from my camera and making all the rest – including people – blurred and out of focus. So I did, shooting more or less 5 or 6 photos, with and without people.

Initially the purpose was photographing the square, therefore my idea was discarding those images with people that were passing in front of my camera and keeping the other(s). But when I downloaded all the photos to start editing them, I was particularly attracted by this one posted here, with the lady dressed with a big fur watching me. Since she’s out of focus, I started imagining what she could think about me: is she looking at me in an intimidating way? Is she simply curious? Does she think I’m crazy? I will never know the answer… (unless she recognizes herself on my blog). 

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The House On The Hill (Colli Orientali del Friuli)

Udine (Italy). This is the landscape I had in front of my eyes in a cold February afternoon, driving around the “Oriental Hills of Friuli” (Colli Orientali del Friuli, in Italian). Same place but different situation of this one, which was captured in September, immediately before the grape harvest. I loved it, but I had very few minutes to capture it. Just the time to set the camera and click.

Initially, I thought the image was too dark. Underexposed – I should say.

But this is what my eyes were watching at that moment, few minutes before the end of the so called golden hour – the time window before and after the sunset.

I’m not a Photoshop user; I just apply some basic enhancements to my photos (if necessary), but I can’t completely change them. I’m not saying I don’t love long exposures photos, but in the past times – especially since I have been starting shooting with a Leica M camera – I capture what I see. And if I see something of beautiful but in a dark environment, why should I change reality? Perhaps, holding a Leica M in my hands makes me feel more “reporter” than “landscape photographer”. For sure, I do photography for myself and my well-being, so I do not care about classifications.

Without a screen (I’m photographing with a Leica M-D camera) I couldn’t see the result. Only some (several) days after, I could download this photo. Initially, I was a bit disappointed. But when I started remembering the moment when I captured it, I realized the scene was like this, and this image is a faithful reproduction of reality.

Sorry, but I love photography too much to do it in a different way.


Udine. Questo è il panorama che avevo davanti ai miei occhi in un freddo pomeriggio di Febbraio, mentre guidavo in giro per i Colli Orientali del Friuli. Lo stesso posto ma una differente situazione di questo che ho fotografato a Settembre, poco prima la vendemmia. Mi piaceva, ma avevo pochissimi minuti per fotografarlo. Giusto il tempo di preparare la macchina e cliccare.

Inizialmente pensavo che l’immagine fosse troppos cura. Sottoesposta, dovrei dire.

Ma questo è ciò che i miei occhi hanno visto in quel momento, pochi minuti prima della fine della cosiddetta “golden hour” (ora dorata) – la finestra di tempo prima e dopo il tramonto.

Non utilizzo Photoshop; mi limito ad alcuni miglioramenti di base (se necessari), ma non posso completamente cambiare le mie foto. Non dico che non ami le foto fatte con un’esposizione lunga, ma negli ultimi tempi – specialmente da quando ho iniziato a fotografare con una Leica M – fotografo quello che vedo. E se vedo qualcosa di bello ma in un contesto con poca luce, perchè dovrei cambiare la realtà? Forse, avendo una Leica M tra le mani, mi sento più un reporter che non un fotografo di panorami. Di sicuro, fotografo per me stesso e per il mio benessere, per cui non mi interesso delle classificazioni.

Senza uno schermo (utilizzo una Leica M-D) non potevo vedere il risultato. Solo dopo (diversi) giorni ho potuto scaricare questa foto. Inizialmente ero un po’ deluso. Ma quando ho iniziato a ricordare il momento in cui l’ho scattata, ho realizzato che la scena era così, e che questa foto era una fedele rappresentazione della realtà.

Chiedo scusa, ma amo troppo la fotografia per farla in modo diverso da questo.

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Trieste in Chiaroscuro (Palazzo del Governo)

Trieste (Italy). I love photographing when the sun goes down and paints the buildings facades with a warm tonality, creating at the same time long dark shadows. I have even created a tag to describe this special situation of contrasts – naming it “chiaroscuro”.

Some days ago I was walking around Piazza Unità d’Italia in Trieste, undoubtedly one of the most beautiful squares in Italy, and the sunset was partially painting the elegant facade of the “Palazzo del Governo” (Government Building), which today hosts the Province and the Prefecture. Is there any better situation to enrich my gallery of chiaroscuro photos?


Trieste. Mi piace fotografare quando il sole scende e colora con una tonalità calda le facciate dei palazzi, creando al tempo stesso lunghe ombre scure. Ho anche creato un tag – l’ho chiamato appunto “chiaroscuro” – per descrivere questa speciale situazione di contrasti.

Alcuni giorni fa ero in Piazza Unità d’Italia a Trieste, senza dubbio una delle piazze più belle d’Italia, e il tramonto colorava una parte della facciata dell’elegante Palazzo del Governo, sede della Provincia e della Prefettura. Quale miglior occasione per arricchire la mia galleria di foto in chiaroscuro?

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Shooting Poplars With Slow Shutter Speed

Some days ago I posted a photo of Venice that, due to its highly contrasted tones, was resembling a Macchiaioli’s painting. This time I’m posting an image that looks like coming from the Impressionism movement. Well, I took this photo with the clear intent of making an experiment: I tried to shoot some poplars trees with a slow shutter speed, moving (rotating) my camera in a bottom-up sense. At the end, I liked the final effect: it is a bit abstract and mesmerizing, but still nice to be observed.

For your information, these poplars are in Friuli Venezia Giulia, a wonderful region in the north-east of Italy.

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Fall Is Not Only a Matter of Death Leaves and Grey Colours

Somewhere in Friuli-Venezia Giulia (Italy). A yellow flower surfaces from a foliage in a wood of poplars. Because fall is not only a matter of death leaves and grey colours…


Da qualche parte nel Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Un fiore giallo spunta dal fogliame in un bosco di pioppi. Perché l’autunno non è solo una questione di foglie morte e colori grigi…

 

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Glimpse of Udine Before Climbing Up to the Castle (Loggia del Lionello)

Udine (Italy). Giovanni Boccaccio mentions Udine and the Friuli region in the 10th Day’s “Fifth Novel” of his most famous masterpiece Decameron written in 1350.

“In Friuli, a country, though cold, glad with goodly mountains and store of rivers and clear springs, is a city called Udine…”

The feelings I have when I walk around Udine are those of a very pleasant city with high life quality, characterized by a typical medieval urban tissue perfectly integrated with stylish shops, cozy cafes and beautiful bookstores.

I love so much visiting Udine and photographing its glimpses. This one in the image is the colonnade along the steep way to the Castle, captured some days ago at sunset.


Udine. Giovanni Boccaccio menziona Udine e il Friuli nella “Novella Quinta” della decima giornata del suo celebre Decameron, scritto intorno al 1350:

“In Frioli, paese, quantunque freddo, lieto di belle montagne, di più fiumi e di chiare fontane, è una terra chiamata Udine…”

Le sensazioni che si hanno passeggiando per Udine sono quelle di una cittadina assai piacevole con una alta qualità della vita, caratterizzata da un’impronta urbanistica tipicamente medievale che si concilia perfettamente con negozi eleganti, caffè ospitali e belle librerie.

Mi piace molto visitare Udine e fotografarne alcuni suoi scorci. Questo nella foto è il colonnato che accompagna la ripida salita al Castello, in uno scatto fatto giorni fa al tramonto.

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