Tag:

Nikon D300s

Being a Commuter in Istanbul (Winter is Coming)

Istanbul (Turkey). Sometimes I should post my photos without writing my thoughts: not because I’m lazy, or because I’m overwhelmed with my work. More simply, because some photos speak for themselves.

Before reading below, please take few seconds and think about what this photo is saying. You can keep it for yourself or write a comment if you want: it does not matter; the goal is to make you watch something without the usual rush.

Why I’m doing this? Because this what usually happens when you are a commuter in Istanbul… You are always, constantly in a hurry, and thousands of people around you are in the same situation: most probably, you will have to take a bus, then a boat, then a metro and finally maybe a taxi or a “dolmus”… However – here I’m coming with my message – if you can find the time to “think about what you are doing”, then you will realize that the frustration of “being a commuter” can develop into the consciousness and – let me say – emotion of “being a commuter in Istanbul”.

I took this photo some years ago, and it is still one of my favorite one: I was waiting for my boat, but I was so hypnotized by the situation, that I remained on the side of the Bosphorus for a long time watching this scene. What for everyone – me included – was something of absolutely normal (even boring or, as I said, frustrating) was slowly becoming unique. The ferry (in Turkish they are called “vapur”, keeping the old name of steamboats) was slowly leaving the dock from Uskudar to bring people to Besiktas: the sky is grey, the city’s colors are totally erased. A group of seagulls is following the boat, and people are feeding the animals with small pieces taken from their “simit”. In the background, the Galata Tower interrupts the skyline made of old houses and some mosques.

Now, think about it one more time: how is being a commuter in Istanbul?

 

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
The Natural Arch of Legzira Beach, Morocco

Sidi Ifni (Morocco). Last night, reading a news website, I sadly discovered that one of the natural arches of Legzira – a beach in Sidi Ifni, close to Agadir on the Atlantic coast of Morocco – collapsed for natural reasons. I link this place with the memories of an amazing “on-the-road” trip, thousands and thousands of kilometers around Morocco, freely deciding the itinerary day by day and discovering its incredible beauties. It was between the end of 2009 and the beginning of 2010.

This photograph (and the others posted with the tag “Legzira”) has been taken on January 2nd, 2010: the new year’s eve’s excitement was just over and that afternoon, with the sun offering a magic sunset going down into the Atlantic Ocean, I spent several hours contemplating this wonder and the surrounding landscape, as well as making good resolutions for the new year which had just begun. And since at the end the 2010 had been an important year of my life, I like to imagine that this place in a certain sense brought me luck.

For this reason too, the idea that one of the natural arches of Legzira does not exist anymore makes me very sad. I remember that in front of such an amazing wonder, I understood how much nature can build great masterworks! And today, sadly, I also understand that as it can build, it can destroy. In a certain sense, it’s possible to imagine that nature does not have the sensibility to preserve something of beautiful, something built or excavated in thousands and thousands of years. No, nature must go on along its own way without being satisfied for what it has been able to do: nature must proceed along its path, and if this means destroying something, it does not matter. I don’t think there’s too much to do, just getting consciousness of our impotence: and if we want to deceive ourselves that we can stop the natural development of things, the only way we can do it is just shooting a photo.


Sidi Ifni (Marocco). Ieri sera, guardando il sito di un giornale, ho letto la bruttissima notizia che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira – spiaggia sulla costa atlantica del Marocco nei pressi di Sidi Ifni, vicino ad Agadir – è collassato in maniera naturale. Lego a questo posto il ricordo di un viaggio bellissimo, tutto “on-the-road”: migliaia e migliaia di chilometri per il Marocco a scoprirne le sue incredibili bellezze a cavallo tra il 2009 e il 2010, decidendo giorno per giorno l’itinerario in totale libertà.

Questa foto (e le altre che ho postato con il tag Legzira) è stata scattata il 2 gennaio 2010: da poco si era spento l’entusiasmo del capodanno e quel pomeriggio, con il sole che scendeva nell’Oceano Atlantico regalandomi un tramonto magico, passai diverse ore in contemplazione di questa meraviglia e del panorama circostante, facendo buoni propositi per l’anno appena cominciato. E visto che il 2010 fu un anno che importante della mia vita, mi piace pensare che questo posto mi abbia in un certo senso portato fortuna.

Anche per questo l’idea che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira non ci sia più mi intristisce molto. Ricordo che di fronte a un simile spettacolo, capii quanto la natura sia capace di costruire cose grandiose! E oggi, tristemente, comprendo anche che come le costruisce, le distrugge. In un certo senso, si può pensare che la natura non abbia la sensibilità di conservare un qualcosa di bello, magari che ha impiegato migilaia di anni per essere realizzato. No, la natura deve andare avanti per la sua strada senza mai compiacersi di quello che ha saputo fare: la natura deve proseguire nel suo cammino, e se questo vuol dire distruggere, non importa. Non credo ci sia molto da fare se non diventare consapevoli della nostra impotenza: e se proprio ci illudiamo di fermare il corso della natura, l’unico modo per farlo è proprio scattandole delle fotografie.

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
Broken Chain Berlin

Berlin (Germany). The Berlin’s “Broken Chain” is my photo of today. Well, this is indeed one of the most popular monument in Berlin, and its meaning is very clear: it’s about the two divided sides of the city – Est and West. But as it symbolise the separation between the two parts of the city, I think it is the most appropriate picture for me today. Those who know me perfectly understand what I’m talking about…

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
Singing a Peace Song (Hiroshima 70th anniversary)

Hiroshima (Japan). Today it’s the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, that destroyed more than two thirds of the city killing 70,000 people instantly, with an unknown final death toll.

I visited Hiroshima exactly five years ago: I arrived there very few days after the 65th year celebrations, and I was honestly surprised by this place, which was the protagonist of one of the most horrible episodes in the world history. I was – as said – surprised because I realised that everything in Hiroshima was talking about “peace”: the most famous landmark is the Peace Memorial (commonly called the Atomic Bomb Dome), which is also part of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, memories are conserved at the Peace Memorial Museum, and the Flame of Peace (designed by Kenzo Tange) burns continuously days and nights since it was lit in 1964 and it will remain lit until all nuclear bombs on the planet are destroyed and the planet is free from the threat of nuclear annihilation.

Yes, “peace”. Walking around Hiroshima – one more time – the most common word is “Peace”. I found in it a very strong message for all of us: a message of hope and forgiveness, something that will be inherited by future generations, something that is difficult to imagine normally, and for this reason it is even more special considering – again – the history of Hiroshima.

When during a night walk along the Ota River, I saw this young Japanese girl playing a song with her guitar, with still the word “Peace” echoing into my mind, I immediately stopped and I stood up listening to her. It was one of those moments that make a trip, and still today – when I think about Japan – the first episode that comes to my mind is this one.

I took this photo (and few others more) because I found the entire scene very symbolic: a peace song played in front of the Peace Memorial (which is mirroring itself on the river’s water surface), in the heart of a city which became an example of “pacific pride” for the rest of the world. It was a perfect moment, no need to explain more.

Today, 5 years after that my personal experience (which is still incredibly vivid in my mind and in my heart) and especially 70 years after that tragic day – when the atomic bomb “Little Boy” killed hundreds of thousands of people – I like to think about Hiroshima in this way, and like its citizens I want to share my humble but heart-felt message of hope and peace.

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
Landscape of Fes

Fes (Morocco). I was very impressed when I saw this landscape of Fes. Particularly, I was intrigued by the contrast between the fierce, tall, solid mosque’s minaret, and the confused background of many small houses. I like landscapes when are made by elements in clear opposition among themselves: I can stay hours watching the same scene without getting bored. Fes is one of the “must-sees” in Morocco: getting lost in its Medina and walking along its narrow alleys is a life experience that I will never forget.

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
The Natural Arches of Legzira Beach, Morocco

Sidi Ifni (Morocco). Last night, reading a news website, I sadly discovered that one of the natural arches of Legzira – a beach in Sidi Ifni, close to Agadir on the Atlantic coast of Morocco – collapsed for natural reasons. I link this place with the memories of an amazing “on-the-road” trip, thousands and thousands of kilometers around Morocco, freely deciding the itinerary day by day and discovering its incredible beauties. It was between the end of 2009 and the beginning of 2010.

This photograph (and the others posted with the tag “Legzira”) has been taken on January 2nd, 2010: the new year’s eve’s excitement was just over and that afternoon, with the sun offering a magic sunset going down into the Atlantic Ocean, I spent several hours contemplating this wonder and the surrounding landscape, as well as making good resolutions for the new year which had just begun. And since at the end the 2010 had been an important year of my life, I like to imagine that this place in a certain sense brought me luck.

For this reason too, the idea that one of the natural arches of Legzira does not exist anymore makes me very sad. I remember that in front of such an amazing wonder, I understood how much nature can build great masterworks! And today, sadly, I also understand that as it can build, it can destroy. In a certain sense, it’s possible to imagine that nature does not have the sensibility to preserve something of beautiful, something built or excavated in thousands and thousands of years. No, nature must go on along its own way without being satisfied for what it has been able to do: nature must proceed along its path, and if this means destroying something, it does not matter. I don’t think there’s too much to do, just getting consciousness of our impotence: and if we want to deceive ourselves that we can stop the natural development of things, the only way we can do it is just shooting a photo.


Sidi Ifni (Marocco). Ieri sera, guardando il sito di un giornale, ho letto la bruttissima notizia che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira – spiaggia sulla costa atlantica del Marocco nei pressi di Sidi Ifni, vicino ad Agadir – è collassato in maniera naturale. Lego a questo posto il ricordo di un viaggio bellissimo, tutto “on-the-road”: migliaia e migliaia di chilometri per il Marocco a scoprirne le sue incredibili bellezze a cavallo tra il 2009 e il 2010, decidendo giorno per giorno l’itinerario in totale libertà.

Questa foto (e le altre che ho postato con il tag Legzira) è stata scattata il 2 gennaio 2010: da poco si era spento l’entusiasmo del capodanno e quel pomeriggio, con il sole che scendeva nell’Oceano Atlantico regalandomi un tramonto magico, passai diverse ore in contemplazione di questa meraviglia e del panorama circostante, facendo buoni propositi per l’anno appena cominciato. E visto che il 2010 fu un anno che importante della mia vita, mi piace pensare che questo posto mi abbia in un certo senso portato fortuna.

Anche per questo l’idea che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira non ci sia più mi intristisce molto. Ricordo che di fronte a un simile spettacolo, capii quanto la natura sia capace di costruire cose grandiose! E oggi, tristemente, comprendo anche che come le costruisce, le distrugge. In un certo senso, si può pensare che la natura non abbia la sensibilità di conservare un qualcosa di bello, magari che ha impiegato migilaia di anni per essere realizzato. No, la natura deve andare avanti per la sua strada senza mai compiacersi di quello che ha saputo fare: la natura deve proseguire nel suo cammino, e se questo vuol dire distruggere, non importa. Non credo ci sia molto da fare se non diventare consapevoli della nostra impotenza: e se proprio ci illudiamo di fermare il corso della natura, l’unico modo per farlo è proprio scattandole delle fotografie.

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
The Natural Arches of Legzira Beach, Morocco

Sidi Ifni (Morocco). Last night, reading a news website, I sadly discovered that one of the natural arches of Legzira – a beach in Sidi Ifni, close to Agadir on the Atlantic coast of Morocco – collapsed for natural reasons. I link this place with the memories of an amazing “on-the-road” trip, thousands and thousands of kilometers around Morocco, freely deciding the itinerary day by day and discovering its incredible beauties. It was between the end of 2009 and the beginning of 2010.

This photograph (and the others posted with the tag “Legzira”) has been taken on January 2nd, 2010: the new year’s eve’s excitement was just over and that afternoon, with the sun offering a magic sunset going down into the Atlantic Ocean, I spent several hours contemplating this wonder and the surrounding landscape, as well as making good resolutions for the new year which had just begun. And since at the end the 2010 had been an important year of my life, I like to imagine that this place in a certain sense brought me luck.

For this reason too, the idea that one of the natural arches of Legzira does not exist anymore makes me very sad. I remember that in front of such an amazing wonder, I understood how much nature can build great masterworks! And today, sadly, I also understand that as it can build, it can destroy. In a certain sense, it’s possible to imagine that nature does not have the sensibility to preserve something of beautiful, something built or excavated in thousands and thousands of years. No, nature must go on along its own way without being satisfied for what it has been able to do: nature must proceed along its path, and if this means destroying something, it does not matter. I don’t think there’s too much to do, just getting consciousness of our impotence: and if we want to deceive ourselves that we can stop the natural development of things, the only way we can do it is just shooting a photo.


Sidi Ifni (Marocco). Ieri sera, guardando il sito di un giornale, ho letto la bruttissima notizia che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira – spiaggia sulla costa atlantica del Marocco nei pressi di Sidi Ifni, vicino ad Agadir – è collassato in maniera naturale. Lego a questo posto il ricordo di un viaggio bellissimo, tutto “on-the-road”: migliaia e migliaia di chilometri per il Marocco a scoprirne le sue incredibili bellezze a cavallo tra il 2009 e il 2010, decidendo giorno per giorno l’itinerario in totale libertà.

Questa foto (e le altre che ho postato con il tag Legzira) è stata scattata il 2 gennaio 2010: da poco si era spento l’entusiasmo del capodanno e quel pomeriggio, con il sole che scendeva nell’Oceano Atlantico regalandomi un tramonto magico, passai diverse ore in contemplazione di questa meraviglia e del panorama circostante, facendo buoni propositi per l’anno appena cominciato. E visto che il 2010 fu un anno che importante della mia vita, mi piace pensare che questo posto mi abbia in un certo senso portato fortuna.

Anche per questo l’idea che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira non ci sia più mi intristisce molto. Ricordo che di fronte a un simile spettacolo, capii quanto la natura sia capace di costruire cose grandiose! E oggi, tristemente, comprendo anche che come le costruisce, le distrugge. In un certo senso, si può pensare che la natura non abbia la sensibilità di conservare un qualcosa di bello, magari che ha impiegato migilaia di anni per essere realizzato. No, la natura deve andare avanti per la sua strada senza mai compiacersi di quello che ha saputo fare: la natura deve proseguire nel suo cammino, e se questo vuol dire distruggere, non importa. Non credo ci sia molto da fare se non diventare consapevoli della nostra impotenza: e se proprio ci illudiamo di fermare il corso della natura, l’unico modo per farlo è proprio scattandole delle fotografie.

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
Ouzoud Waterfalls

Marrakesh (Morocco). Not too far from the city of Marrakesh, there are the wonderful Ouzoud waterfalls. Tourists can even go close to the water falling from the top of the mountain, using one of the boats rowed by locals. However, it’s a place that deserves a visit contemplating the large amount of water and the contrast with the dryness of the region. And – as for every important waterfall – listening to the sound of water…

0 Facebook Twitter Google + Pinterest
Newer Posts