Tag:

Sea

Sunset from the Church of Soccorso, Forio (Ischia)

Naples (Italy). I don’t like (anymore) photographing a sunset “in itself”, stand alone; unless there is something else in the image that can characterise it. Yesterday I was shooting some photos around Forio, a lovely small village on the Ischia Island – not far from Naples, in the South of Italy. Here, there is a small church called “Chiesa dell Soccorso” (literally translated, “Church of the Rescue”) and around it, plenty of people gather together every day to assist the show of the sunset in the sea.

I took this photo to celebrate the beginning of my summer holidays…

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The Natural Arch of Legzira Beach, Morocco

Sidi Ifni (Morocco). Last night, reading a news website, I sadly discovered that one of the natural arches of Legzira – a beach in Sidi Ifni, close to Agadir on the Atlantic coast of Morocco – collapsed for natural reasons. I link this place with the memories of an amazing “on-the-road” trip, thousands and thousands of kilometers around Morocco, freely deciding the itinerary day by day and discovering its incredible beauties. It was between the end of 2009 and the beginning of 2010.

This photograph (and the others posted with the tag “Legzira”) has been taken on January 2nd, 2010: the new year’s eve’s excitement was just over and that afternoon, with the sun offering a magic sunset going down into the Atlantic Ocean, I spent several hours contemplating this wonder and the surrounding landscape, as well as making good resolutions for the new year which had just begun. And since at the end the 2010 had been an important year of my life, I like to imagine that this place in a certain sense brought me luck.

For this reason too, the idea that one of the natural arches of Legzira does not exist anymore makes me very sad. I remember that in front of such an amazing wonder, I understood how much nature can build great masterworks! And today, sadly, I also understand that as it can build, it can destroy. In a certain sense, it’s possible to imagine that nature does not have the sensibility to preserve something of beautiful, something built or excavated in thousands and thousands of years. No, nature must go on along its own way without being satisfied for what it has been able to do: nature must proceed along its path, and if this means destroying something, it does not matter. I don’t think there’s too much to do, just getting consciousness of our impotence: and if we want to deceive ourselves that we can stop the natural development of things, the only way we can do it is just shooting a photo.


Sidi Ifni (Marocco). Ieri sera, guardando il sito di un giornale, ho letto la bruttissima notizia che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira – spiaggia sulla costa atlantica del Marocco nei pressi di Sidi Ifni, vicino ad Agadir – è collassato in maniera naturale. Lego a questo posto il ricordo di un viaggio bellissimo, tutto “on-the-road”: migliaia e migliaia di chilometri per il Marocco a scoprirne le sue incredibili bellezze a cavallo tra il 2009 e il 2010, decidendo giorno per giorno l’itinerario in totale libertà.

Questa foto (e le altre che ho postato con il tag Legzira) è stata scattata il 2 gennaio 2010: da poco si era spento l’entusiasmo del capodanno e quel pomeriggio, con il sole che scendeva nell’Oceano Atlantico regalandomi un tramonto magico, passai diverse ore in contemplazione di questa meraviglia e del panorama circostante, facendo buoni propositi per l’anno appena cominciato. E visto che il 2010 fu un anno che importante della mia vita, mi piace pensare che questo posto mi abbia in un certo senso portato fortuna.

Anche per questo l’idea che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira non ci sia più mi intristisce molto. Ricordo che di fronte a un simile spettacolo, capii quanto la natura sia capace di costruire cose grandiose! E oggi, tristemente, comprendo anche che come le costruisce, le distrugge. In un certo senso, si può pensare che la natura non abbia la sensibilità di conservare un qualcosa di bello, magari che ha impiegato migilaia di anni per essere realizzato. No, la natura deve andare avanti per la sua strada senza mai compiacersi di quello che ha saputo fare: la natura deve proseguire nel suo cammino, e se questo vuol dire distruggere, non importa. Non credo ci sia molto da fare se non diventare consapevoli della nostra impotenza: e se proprio ci illudiamo di fermare il corso della natura, l’unico modo per farlo è proprio scattandole delle fotografie.

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Fishermen Putting Out to Sea At Sunset

Dubrovnik (Croatia). Is there a word – in any language – that describes the sense of summer given by a winter day exceptionally warm? I’m thinking about a possible neologism able to summarize this feeling, which more or less has been experienced by everyone as soon as daylight becomes longer, winter moves closer to the end and, most important, temperatures become more acceptable, almost pleasantly mild. “Summarization”? Not yet; damn, it will be summer in so many months… Dewinterization? Neither, it sounds ugly… Animals have “to emerge from hibernation”, which could fit with what I want to mean: definitely they are one step ahead us!

However, I think it’s pretty clear this was my feeling yesterday: in fact, with a nice sun shining and a perfect temperature (considering it was the last day of January) I had in my mind and in my body the feeling it was finally time of “emerging from hibernation” And apparently I was not alone, since there were all around a lot of people walking, jogging or simply enjoying open-air time: so nice!

Once back home after a healthy run around the park, my positive mood brought me to surf and explore through my photographic archive, just to find an unpublished photo from the last summer and to prolong the nice feeling described above. As I always like to realize, watching my old photos is somehow like re-living the moments when I captured them. And I perfectly remember the situation behind this photo…

It was during last summer: I was going to Dubrovnik – a lovely town in Croatia and one of the top ranked places to see in 2016 according to many travel magazines – and a wonderful sunset was coloring the sky with a warm mix of orange and pink. As I was approaching the harbor, I crossed this fishing boat putting out to sea. I have always had a special interest for fishermen: even when I was a baby, one of my dreams was spending one night on a boat watching fishermen pulling the nets out of the sea. However, it remained a dream, but maybe one day it will become a nice reportage.

With this photo, I try not only to extend the nice mood I have been having since yesterday – although today it was foggy and cold, unfortunately – but also to spread out a bit of optimism saying to all my followers that, sooner or later, summer is definitely coming and this is one of the few certainties I can count on.

 

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Fishing Along The Shoreline (Lignano Riviera)

Lignano Riviera (Italy). This photograph dates back to almost one year ago: I took it at the end of last August, when I was in Lignano (Lignano Riviera, to be precise), a touristic spot in Friuli Venezia Giulia (in the North-East of Italy). I still remember that when I took this image, there was a fantastic warm and gentle light – it was around 7.30 PM, the so called “golden hour”, and the sun was going down just behind my – and my eyes were captured by this young boy fishing (or maybe playing as a fisherman) along the shoreline.

I don’t know why I did not consider this photograph immediately: maybe because initially I was much more intrigued by another image, captured and published that same day, and which was representing the concept of “end of summer”. However, in these days I was leafing through my portfolio and I noticed this scene: I looked at it with a different gaze since it was able to give me something like a “sense of calm”, the typical mood that accompanies the last days of summer – as they were when I captured this image. In a certain sense, I can say that this feeling is contrasting with the frenzy that precedes the summer holidays, as it is in these days; and maybe this is the reason why I thought it was a nice photo to be reconsidered (and shared).

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The Natural Arches of Legzira Beach, Morocco

Sidi Ifni (Morocco). Last night, reading a news website, I sadly discovered that one of the natural arches of Legzira – a beach in Sidi Ifni, close to Agadir on the Atlantic coast of Morocco – collapsed for natural reasons. I link this place with the memories of an amazing “on-the-road” trip, thousands and thousands of kilometers around Morocco, freely deciding the itinerary day by day and discovering its incredible beauties. It was between the end of 2009 and the beginning of 2010.

This photograph (and the others posted with the tag “Legzira”) has been taken on January 2nd, 2010: the new year’s eve’s excitement was just over and that afternoon, with the sun offering a magic sunset going down into the Atlantic Ocean, I spent several hours contemplating this wonder and the surrounding landscape, as well as making good resolutions for the new year which had just begun. And since at the end the 2010 had been an important year of my life, I like to imagine that this place in a certain sense brought me luck.

For this reason too, the idea that one of the natural arches of Legzira does not exist anymore makes me very sad. I remember that in front of such an amazing wonder, I understood how much nature can build great masterworks! And today, sadly, I also understand that as it can build, it can destroy. In a certain sense, it’s possible to imagine that nature does not have the sensibility to preserve something of beautiful, something built or excavated in thousands and thousands of years. No, nature must go on along its own way without being satisfied for what it has been able to do: nature must proceed along its path, and if this means destroying something, it does not matter. I don’t think there’s too much to do, just getting consciousness of our impotence: and if we want to deceive ourselves that we can stop the natural development of things, the only way we can do it is just shooting a photo.


Sidi Ifni (Marocco). Ieri sera, guardando il sito di un giornale, ho letto la bruttissima notizia che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira – spiaggia sulla costa atlantica del Marocco nei pressi di Sidi Ifni, vicino ad Agadir – è collassato in maniera naturale. Lego a questo posto il ricordo di un viaggio bellissimo, tutto “on-the-road”: migliaia e migliaia di chilometri per il Marocco a scoprirne le sue incredibili bellezze a cavallo tra il 2009 e il 2010, decidendo giorno per giorno l’itinerario in totale libertà.

Questa foto (e le altre che ho postato con il tag Legzira) è stata scattata il 2 gennaio 2010: da poco si era spento l’entusiasmo del capodanno e quel pomeriggio, con il sole che scendeva nell’Oceano Atlantico regalandomi un tramonto magico, passai diverse ore in contemplazione di questa meraviglia e del panorama circostante, facendo buoni propositi per l’anno appena cominciato. E visto che il 2010 fu un anno che importante della mia vita, mi piace pensare che questo posto mi abbia in un certo senso portato fortuna.

Anche per questo l’idea che uno degli archi naturali di Legzira non ci sia più mi intristisce molto. Ricordo che di fronte a un simile spettacolo, capii quanto la natura sia capace di costruire cose grandiose! E oggi, tristemente, comprendo anche che come le costruisce, le distrugge. In un certo senso, si può pensare che la natura non abbia la sensibilità di conservare un qualcosa di bello, magari che ha impiegato migilaia di anni per essere realizzato. No, la natura deve andare avanti per la sua strada senza mai compiacersi di quello che ha saputo fare: la natura deve proseguire nel suo cammino, e se questo vuol dire distruggere, non importa. Non credo ci sia molto da fare se non diventare consapevoli della nostra impotenza: e se proprio ci illudiamo di fermare il corso della natura, l’unico modo per farlo è proprio scattandole delle fotografie.

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Lunar Eclipse

Porto Cervo (Italy). It’s small, but it’s possible to see that the moon looks partially bitten due to the earth’s shadow on it. From the lunar eclipse of August 7th, 2017.


Porto Cervo (Sardegna, Italia). Anche se piccola, si può vedere che la luna sembra parzialmente “morsicata” a causa dell’ombra della terra. Eclissi lunare, 7 Agosto 2017

 

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Trieste Upside Down

Trieste (Italy). I generally like seaside towns and frontier towns, and for this reason I really love Trieste, which includes these two aspects in the same city. Furthermore, here the Central European soul (Trieste was the main sea access of the Hapsburg Empire, a period of strong economic and demographic growth for the city) merges the Mediterranean one, in a melting pot of races, cultures, religions and lifestyles.

Sometimes I have the opportunity to spend some hours in Trieste, and I think it’s a wonderful city to visit and to photograph, both with its traditional landscapes, both with its hidden corners. In the image here above, I captured the facade of a building along the Canal Grande, taken from a different point of view, reflected on the sea surface. Indeed, the two spirits of Trieste: the Central European one and the Mediterranean one.


Trieste. Personalmente amo molto sia le città di mare che le città di frontiera, e per questo a maggior ragione amo Trieste che ne incarna entrambi gli aspetti. Non solo, ma qui l’anima Mitteleuropea del nord (Trieste è stato il principale sbocco marittimo dell’Impero Asburgico, periodo durante il quale conobbe un’epoca di straordinario sviluppo economico e demografico) si fonde con quella Mediterranea in un crocevia di razze, culture, religioni e stili di vita.

Di tanto in tanto mi capita di aver occasione di passare qualche ora a Trieste, e trovo che sia una città bellissima da vedere e da fotografare sia con i suoi panorami più classici, che con i suoi angoli nascosti. Nella foto qui sopra, la facciata di un palazzo che si affaccia lungo il Canal Grande, presa da un punto di vista un po’ diverso, ossia riflessa sulla superficie del mare. Appunto, le due anime di Trieste: quella Mitteleuropea e quella Mediterranea.

 

 

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An Eye on the Gulf of Naples at Sunset

Naples (Italy). Just few words to “refresh” the homepage. I’m on my way to Naples for a long-weekend-short-holiday. I’m not sure I will have again the privilege of shooting from such an unique and prestigious terrace (I’m referring to the posted photo), but for sure I will do my best – together with my camera – to capture the indisputable beauty of this city…

Naples is a very inspiring place, and every photographer can find his or her personal source of inspiration there: from amazing landscapes, to people on the streets – not forgetting an incredible artistic heritage – photographing around Naples (together with its gulf) has so much to offer, that few days can’t be enough. For several reasons, Naples gives me the same vibrations of Istanbul; I think that these two cities are very similar, not only for the crazy traffic (!) – I will try to use the next days to better understand why these two cities, for me, have so many common aspects: it could be an interesting theme for one of my next posts…

Greetings from Naples!

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