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Udine

Glimpse of Udine Before Climbing Up to the Castle (Loggia del Lionello)

Udine (Italy). Giovanni Boccaccio mentions Udine and the Friuli region in the 10th Day’s “Fifth Novel” of his most famous masterpiece Decameron written in 1350.

“In Friuli, a country, though cold, glad with goodly mountains and store of rivers and clear springs, is a city called Udine…”

The feelings I have when I walk around Udine are those of a very pleasant city with high life quality, characterized by a typical medieval urban tissue perfectly integrated with stylish shops, cozy cafes and beautiful bookstores.

I love so much visiting Udine and photographing its glimpses. This one in the image is the colonnade along the steep way to the Castle, captured some days ago at sunset.


Udine. Giovanni Boccaccio menziona Udine e il Friuli nella “Novella Quinta” della decima giornata del suo celebre Decameron, scritto intorno al 1350:

“In Frioli, paese, quantunque freddo, lieto di belle montagne, di più fiumi e di chiare fontane, è una terra chiamata Udine…”

Le sensazioni che si hanno passeggiando per Udine sono quelle di una cittadina assai piacevole con una alta qualità della vita, caratterizzata da un’impronta urbanistica tipicamente medievale che si concilia perfettamente con negozi eleganti, caffè ospitali e belle librerie.

Mi piace molto visitare Udine e fotografarne alcuni suoi scorci. Questo nella foto è il colonnato che accompagna la ripida salita al Castello, in uno scatto fatto giorni fa al tramonto.

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This Lady Did Not Like Me (Taking Her Photo at f/1.7)

Udine (Italy). I like this kind of situation, and for this reason, I do love my 28 mm summilux, which gives me the freedom of photographing around me (these last three words sound familiar) without caring too much about what people could think.

This is the story behind this photo: everything happened some days ago, when I was having a walk around Udine. It was already dark when I stopped in Piazza San Giacomo – it’s such a lovely place, one of the most popular destinations in town, with very nice cafes and crowded with people that choose this square to meet their friends and chat. The street surrounding the square is all covered with small stones – as many other streets in the old part of Udine – and I liked the effect they can make if I take a photo few centimeters from the ground, focusing half meter from my camera and making all the rest – including people – blurred and out of focus. So I did, shooting more or less 5 or 6 photos, with and without people.

Initially the purpose was photographing the square, therefore my idea was discarding those images with people that were passing in front of my camera and keeping the other(s). But when I downloaded all the photos to start editing them, I was particularly attracted by this one posted here, with the lady dressed with a big fur watching me. Since she’s out of focus, I started imagining what she could think about me: is she looking at me in an intimidating way? Is she simply curious? Does she think I’m crazy? I will never know the answer… (unless she recognizes herself on my blog). 

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The House On The Hill (Colli Orientali del Friuli)

Udine (Italy). This is the landscape I had in front of my eyes in a cold February afternoon, driving around the “Oriental Hills of Friuli” (Colli Orientali del Friuli, in Italian). Same place but different situation of this one, which was captured in September, immediately before the grape harvest. I loved it, but I had very few minutes to capture it. Just the time to set the camera and click.

Initially, I thought the image was too dark. Underexposed – I should say.

But this is what my eyes were watching at that moment, few minutes before the end of the so called golden hour – the time window before and after the sunset.

I’m not a Photoshop user; I just apply some basic enhancements to my photos (if necessary), but I can’t completely change them. I’m not saying I don’t love long exposures photos, but in the past times – especially since I have been starting shooting with a Leica M camera – I capture what I see. And if I see something of beautiful but in a dark environment, why should I change reality? Perhaps, holding a Leica M in my hands makes me feel more “reporter” than “landscape photographer”. For sure, I do photography for myself and my well-being, so I do not care about classifications.

Without a screen (I’m photographing with a Leica M-D camera) I couldn’t see the result. Only some (several) days after, I could download this photo. Initially, I was a bit disappointed. But when I started remembering the moment when I captured it, I realized the scene was like this, and this image is a faithful reproduction of reality.

Sorry, but I love photography too much to do it in a different way.


Udine. Questo è il panorama che avevo davanti ai miei occhi in un freddo pomeriggio di Febbraio, mentre guidavo in giro per i Colli Orientali del Friuli. Lo stesso posto ma una differente situazione di questo che ho fotografato a Settembre, poco prima la vendemmia. Mi piaceva, ma avevo pochissimi minuti per fotografarlo. Giusto il tempo di preparare la macchina e cliccare.

Inizialmente pensavo che l’immagine fosse troppos cura. Sottoesposta, dovrei dire.

Ma questo è ciò che i miei occhi hanno visto in quel momento, pochi minuti prima della fine della cosiddetta “golden hour” (ora dorata) – la finestra di tempo prima e dopo il tramonto.

Non utilizzo Photoshop; mi limito ad alcuni miglioramenti di base (se necessari), ma non posso completamente cambiare le mie foto. Non dico che non ami le foto fatte con un’esposizione lunga, ma negli ultimi tempi – specialmente da quando ho iniziato a fotografare con una Leica M – fotografo quello che vedo. E se vedo qualcosa di bello ma in un contesto con poca luce, perchè dovrei cambiare la realtà? Forse, avendo una Leica M tra le mani, mi sento più un reporter che non un fotografo di panorami. Di sicuro, fotografo per me stesso e per il mio benessere, per cui non mi interesso delle classificazioni.

Senza uno schermo (utilizzo una Leica M-D) non potevo vedere il risultato. Solo dopo (diversi) giorni ho potuto scaricare questa foto. Inizialmente ero un po’ deluso. Ma quando ho iniziato a ricordare il momento in cui l’ho scattata, ho realizzato che la scena era così, e che questa foto era una fedele rappresentazione della realtà.

Chiedo scusa, ma amo troppo la fotografia per farla in modo diverso da questo.

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Time To Say Goodbye

Udine (Italy). We became immediately great friends, and we walked hundreds and hundreds of kilometres all around the world together. It’s not an easy moment, I’m close to cry, but in case like this one there’s no alternative. Thanks for these wonderful years, we had great moments, but now it’s time to separate each others and to say goodbye to my old pair of Birkenstock sandals. A new one already came…

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Villa Manin (Behind The Gate)

Passariano di Codroipo (Italy). The lucky people that were able to visit the Italy Pavilion at Expo Milano 2015, probably noticed this magnificent villa in the video containing the “Italian Excellencies”.

The name of this place is “Villa Manin”: it is an historical building (a typical “Venetian Villa”) placed in the middle of the Friulan countryside, between Pordenone and Udine, not too far from Venice. It was built by the Manin family in the 1650, and today it is owned and managed by the Regione Friuli Venezia Giulia (the regional administration), which uses Villa Manin to host prestigious international exhibitions, including those of some photographers such as Robert Capa (I loved it!) and Man Ray.

Some historical facts: Villa Manin was the residence of Ludovico Manin, the last Doge of Venice. Among its famous guests there was Napoleon Bonaparte, which established here for a couple of months his headquarter during the signature of the Treaty of Campoformio between France and Austria (17 October 1797).

I took this photo without thinking too much about the composition: I simply liked the wide facade of Villa Manin behind the big entrance gate and with a dark cloudy sky in the background. Since the day I took this photo I was just walking and I hadn’t my camera bag with me, I used the small and powerful Ricoh GR camera (always in my jacket’s pocket).

 

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The Illuminated Facade of Villa Manin

Codroipo (Italy). I took the same photo one year ago (here) and I admit that every time I pass in front of Villa Manin at Passariano di Codroipo, I feel the instinct of stopping and photographing it – especially by night.


Codroipo (Udine). Avevo già scattato questa foto l’anno sorso (eccola qui) e devo dire che ogni volta che passo davanti alla Villa Manin di Passariano di Codroipo, mi viene sempre voglia di fermarmi e di fotografarla – soprattutto di notte.

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Poplars. Landscape After a Heavy Rain

Codroipo (Italy). A rainy weekend does not necessarily represent an obstacle for taking some photos of the picturesque Friulan countryside. On the contrary, it’s possible to enjoy landscapes made of poplars, puddles and amazing bright glares…


Codroipo (Udine). Un fine settimana piovoso non necessariamente rappresenta un impedimento per scattare qualche foto alla suggestiva campagna friulana. Anzi, è possibile ammirare panorami fatti di pioppi, pozze e bellissimi riflessi luminosi…

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Foliage (Poplars Wood in Friuli-Venezia Giulia)

Codroipo (Italy). This is the last one, I promise. No, not the last one “in absolute terms”… this blog will go on, and I have a lot of photos to share! I’m talking about “foliage”, this sort of autumnal obsession that has involved me too, also due to a long weekend spent in Friuli-Venezia Giulia with perfect weather and wonderful colors. So, after having played with depth of fields (such as here and here) I decided to post the photo of a long and large wood of poplars (something typical in Friuli).


Codroipo (Udine), Questa è l’ultima, lo prometto. No, non l’ultima “in assoluto”… il blog va avanti, ho un sacco di foto da condividere! Parlo del “foliage”, questa specie di ossessione autunnale che ha coinvolto anche me, complice un fine settimana lungo trascorso in Friuli-Venezia Giulia con tempo bellissimo e colori splendidi. E quindi, dopo un po’ di giochi con le profondità di campo (come questa, e questa) ho deciso di postare la foto di un grande bosco di pioppi (un qualcosa di tipicamente Friulano).

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Vineyard Landscape Before Grape Harvest – Colli Orientali del Friuli

Abbazia di Rosazzo (Italy). Watching a vineyard few days before the grape harvest, makes me feel special emotions: in the wait there’s a sort of emotive tension, which seems being spread through the lines rich of generous grapes waiting for being harvested. And indeed this feeling is not only for vineyards workers, but also for wine lovers, eagerly waiting to know what kind of season it will be.

This landscape has been taken at sunset from the amazing Rosazzo Abbey, above Manzano, on the marvellous “Colli Orientali del Friuli” (a hill zone, some 20 km south-east of Udine, close to the Slovenian border). The white wines prepared here are widely recognised as the best ones in the world, and they bring in their taste the determined personality of people living and working here. The same people – I love to imagine – eagerly waiting for the grape harvest day.


Abbazia di Rosazzo (Udine, Friuli Venezia Giulia). Osservare una vigna a pochi giorni dalla vendemmia genera emozioni speciali: nell’attesa c’è una sorta di tensione che sembra diffondersi tra i filari ricchi di bei grappoli in attesa di essere colti. Ed è così in effetti, non solo per chi con le vigne ci lavora, ma anche per chi ama il vino e attende con ansia di sapere che annata sia stata.

Questo panorama è stato fotografato al tramonto dalla splendida Abbazia di Rosazzo, sopra Manzano, sui meravigliosi Colli Orientali del Friuli. I bianchi che nascono in questa zona sono tra i migliori del mondo, e ne portano il carattere deciso delle persone che qui vivono e lavorano. E che – mi piace immaginare – aspettano con ansia il giorno della vendemmia.

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Climbing Up to the Castle (Salita al Castello di Udine)

Udine (Italy). Giovanni Boccaccio mentions Udine and the Friuli region in the 10th Day’s “Fifth Novel” of his most famous masterpiece Decameron written in 1350.

“In Friuli, a country, though cold, glad with goodly mountains and store of rivers and clear springs, is a city called Udine…”

The feelings I have when I walk around Udine are those of a very pleasant city with high life quality, characterized by a typical medieval urban tissue perfectly integrated with stylish shops, cozy cafes and beautiful bookstores.

I love so much visiting Udine and photographing its glimpses. This one in the image is the colonnade along the steep way to the Castle, captured some days ago at sunset.


Udine. Giovanni Boccaccio menziona Udine e il Friuli nella “Novella Quinta” della decima giornata del suo celebre Decameron, scritto intorno al 1350:

“In Frioli, paese, quantunque freddo, lieto di belle montagne, di più fiumi e di chiare fontane, è una terra chiamata Udine…”

Le sensazioni che si hanno passeggiando per Udine sono quelle di una cittadina assai piacevole con una alta qualità della vita, caratterizzata da un’impronta urbanistica tipicamente medievale che si concilia perfettamente con negozi eleganti, caffè ospitali e belle librerie.

Mi piace molto visitare Udine e fotografarne alcuni suoi scorci. Questo nella foto è il colonnato che accompagna la ripida salita al Castello, in uno scatto fatto giorni fa al tramonto.

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